The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Updated to reflect change to Travel Advisory Level 3.

Reconsider travel to New Caledonia due to civil unrest and crime.

On May 15, 2024, the French Government declared a state of emergency due to the ongoing riots throughout New Caledonia over electoral reform. The French Government closed the La Tontouta International Airport on May 14, 2024. The French Government also has taken and/or could take additional measures, including curfews, restrictions on freedom of movement, ID verification, and increased security inspections. Follow any state of emergency measures imposed in your province.

Protests, demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and have turned violent. During civil unrest, all commercial transportation may become unavailable for U.S. citizens wishing to depart New Caledonia without warning. The U.S. government is extremely limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in New Caledonia  – assistance on site is available only from local authorities.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to New Caledonia.

If you decide to travel to New Caledonia: 

Posted: May 17, 2024, 12:00 am

Location: Worldwide

Event: Due to the potential for terrorist attacks, demonstrations, or violent actions against U.S. citizens and interests, the Department of State advises U.S. citizens overseas to exercise increased caution.  The Department of State is aware of the increased potential for foreign terrorist organization-inspired violence against LGBTQI+ persons and events and advises U.S. citizens overseas to exercise increased caution.  U.S. citizens should:

  • Stay alert in locations frequented by tourists, including Pride celebrations and venues frequented by LGBTQI+ persons.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive information and alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency overseas.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
Posted: May 17, 2024, 12:00 am

Updated to reflect changes in the country summary and information on the Sulu Archipelago, Marawi City.

Exercise increased caution to the Philippines due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • The Sulu Archipelago, including the southern Sulu Sea, due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, and kidnapping.
  • Marawi City in Mindanao due to terrorism and civil unrest.

Reconsider Travel to:

  • Other areas of Mindanao due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, and kidnapping.

Country Summary: Terrorists and armed groups have carried out kidnappings, bombings, and other attacks targeting public areas like tourist sites, markets, and local government facilities in the Philippines.  Violent crimes are also common in the Philippines such as robbery, kidnappings, and physical assaults. Protests happen in the Philippines and could turn violent and/or result in traffic jams and road closures with limited capacity of the local government to respond.

There are stringent travel protocols and restrictions for U.S. government employees under the U.S. Embassy’s (Chief of Mission) security responsibility when traveling to certain areas of the country as stated below.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Philippines.

If you decide to travel to the Philippines:

The Sulu Archipelago and Sulu Sea – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist and armed groups in the Sulu Archipelago and the Sulu Sea have historically engaged in kidnappings for ransom on land and at sea, in addition to bombings and other attacks. These incidents often target foreign nationals, including U.S. citizens, local government entities, and security personnel.

The U.S. government’s ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in this region is very limited. U.S. government employees under the U.S. Embassy’s (Chief of Mission) security responsibility are required to obtain special authorization to travel to these areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Marawi City in Mindanao – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Civilians face risk of death or injury from ongoing clashes between terrorist group remnants and Philippine security forces in Marawi.

The U.S. government’s ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Marawi City is very limited. U.S. government employees under the U.S. Embassy’s (Chief of Mission) security responsibility are required to obtain special authorization to travel to Marawi City.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mindanao (except Davao City, Davao del Norte Province, Siargao Island, and the Dinagat Islands) – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Terrorist and armed groups in Mindanao have historically engaged in kidnappings for ransom, in addition to bombings and other attacks. These incidents often target foreign nationals, including U.S. citizens, as well as civilians, local government entities, and security forces.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in large parts of Mindanao. U.S. government employees under the U.S. Embassy’s (Chief of Mission) security responsibility are required to obtain special authorization to travel to areas outside of Davao City, Davao del Norte Province, Siargao Island, and the Dinagat Islands.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Posted: May 16, 2024, 12:00 am

Reissued to update information to high-risk areas.

Exercise increased caution in Tunisia due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.  

Do not travel to:

  • Within 16 km of the Algerian border due to terrorism, except for the cities of Tabarka and Ain Draham.
  • Within 16 km of the border with Libya due to terrorism.
  • The Mount Chaambi National Park, Mount Salloum, Mount Sammamma, and Mount Mghila in Kasserine governorate due to terrorism.
  • The Mount Orbata area in the Gafsa governorate due to terrorism.
  • The desert south of Remada due to the military zone.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Tunisia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, museums, resorts, hotels, festivals, nightclubs, restaurants, religious sites, markets/shopping malls, government facilities and security forces. A country-wide state of emergency, which grants security forces more authority to maintain civil order and enables the government to focus on combating terrorism, is in effect. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in some areas of Tunisia. U.S. government employees under the Embassy’s (Chief of Mission) security responsibility must obtain special authorization to travel outside greater Tunis.  

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tunisia. 

If you decide to travel to Tunisia:

  • Exercise caution when using public transportation, due to safety and security concerns.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Avoid staying overnight outside of the main cities and tourist locations.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • When entering or transiting through Tunisia, avoid bringing in Tunisian currency in any amount and avoid bringing in any foreign currency, including dollars, in excess of the equivalent of TND 10,000. Upon departure including transit through Tunisia, travelers leaving Tunisia must declare any currency amounts above TND 5,000 if they wish to export or depart with that amount.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter/X
  • Review the Country Security Report for Tunisia.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Border with Algeria – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel within 16 km of the Algerian border due to terrorism, except for the cities of Tabarka and Ain Draham.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Border with Libya – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Developments in Libya continue to affect the security situation along the Tunisian-Libyan border in areas such as Ras Jedir and Dehiba along with the cities of Ben Guerdan and Medenine. The border with Libya is frequently closed to all traffic with short notice for extended periods. The Department of State advises U.S. citizens not to travel to Libya. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Kasserine Western Mountains, Mount Mghila in Sidi Bou Zid, and the Mount Chaambi National Park in West-Central Tunisia – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups continue to operate in mountains of Western Tunisia near the Algerian border. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Orbata Mountains in Gafsa in West-Central Tunisia – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups continue to operate in the mountainous areas of Western Tunisia near the Algerian border. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The Desert South of Remada – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The desert south of Remada is designated as a military zone by the Government of Tunisia. Special authorization is required for travelers wishing to enter the military zone.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

 

Posted: May 14, 2024, 12:00 am

Reissued after routine periodic review with minor edits pursuant to Department of State standard processes.

Do not travel to Venezuela due to crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, and the arbitrary enforcement of local laws. Reconsider travel due to wrongful detentions, terrorism, and poor health infrastructure.

Country Summary:  In March 2019, the U.S. Department of State withdrew all diplomatic personnel from U.S. Embassy Caracas and suspended operations. All consular services, routine and emergency, remain suspended until further notice. The U.S. government has no ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Venezuela. U.S. citizens in Venezuela who require consular assistance should try to leave the country as soon as safely possible to do so and should contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in another country.

Violent crimes, such as homicide, armed robbery, kidnapping, and carjacking, are common in Venezuela. Political rallies and demonstrations occur, often with little notice. Anti-Maduro demonstrations have elicited a strong police and security force response, including the use of tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets against participants, and occasionally devolve into looting and vandalism. Shortages of gasoline, electricity, water, medicine, and medical supplies continue throughout much of Venezuela. 

The Department has determined there is a high risk of wrongful detention of U.S. nationals in Venezuela. Security forces have detained U.S. citizens for up to five years. The U.S. government is not generally notified of the detention of U.S. citizens in Venezuela or granted access to U.S. citizen prisoners there.

Colombian terrorist groups operate in Venezuela’s border areas with Colombia, Brazil, and Guyana.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Venezuela.

If you decide to travel to Venezuela:

  • Avoid all land border crossings into Venezuela on the Colombian border.
  • Ensure you have a valid Venezuelan visa. Visas are not available upon arrival.
  • Be prepared for the high risk of indefinite detention without consular access. 
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization. Establish a “proof of life” protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Have a contingency plan in place that does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Avoid travel between cities, or between Simón Bolívar International Airport and Caracas at night.
  • Do not take unregulated taxis from the Maiquetia “Simón Bolívar” International Airport and avoid ATMs in this area.
  • Consider hiring a professional security organization.
  • Bring a sufficient supply of over the counter and prescription medicines for the duration of travel.
  • Consider purchasing medical evacuation insurance.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Venezuela.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

 

Posted: May 13, 2024, 12:00 am

Reissued after periodic review without changes.                  

Exercise normal precautions in Poland.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Poland.

If you decide to travel to Poland:                                  

Posted: May 1, 2024, 12:00 am

Reissued after periodic review with minor edits

Exercise increased caution in Germany due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups keep planning attacks in Germany. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning. They target tourist locations and transportation hubs. They also target markets/shopping malls and local government facilities. They target hotels, clubs, and restaurants. They also attack places of worship, parks, and major sporting and cultural events. They target schools, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Germany.

If you decide to travel to Germany:

  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Country Security Report for Germany.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Posted: May 1, 2024, 12:00 am

Updated to reflect the termination of Ordered Departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and eligible family members.

Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism, kidnapping, armed conflict, civil unrest, and Mission Iraq’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

On April 1, 2024, the Department terminated the Ordered Departure status for U.S. Embassy Baghdad and U.S. Consulate General Erbil. However, the Travel Advisory level for Iraq remains at Level 4, advising that U.S. citizens not travel to Iraq.

Country Summary: U.S. citizens in Iraq face high risks to their safety and security, including the potential for violence and kidnapping. Terrorist and insurgent groups regularly attack Iraqi security forces and civilians. Anti-U.S. militias threaten U.S. citizens and international companies throughout Iraq. Attacks using improvised explosive devices, indirect fire, and unmanned aerial vehicles occur in many areas of the country, including Baghdad and other major cities. In an emergency, consular services to U.S. citizens in Iraq are limited due to severe restrictions on the movements of U.S. government personnel.

Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently throughout the country. These events can develop quickly without prior notice, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services, and sometimes turning violent.

Do not travel near Iraq’s northern borders due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, aerial bombardment, and civil unrest. U.S. citizens should especially avoid areas near armed groups in northern Iraq, which have been targeted with aerial strikes by neighboring countries’ militaries.

U.S. citizens should not travel through Iraq to engage in armed conflict in Syria, where they would face extreme personal risks (kidnapping, injury, or death) and legal risks (arrest, fines, and expulsion). The Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq has stated that it will impose prison sentences of up to ten years on individuals who illegally cross the Iraq-Syria border. Additionally, fighting on behalf of or supporting designated terrorist organizations is a crime under U.S. law that can result in prison sentences and large fines in the United States.

Because of security concerns, U.S. government personnel in Baghdad are instructed not to use Baghdad International Airport. Due to risks to civil aviation operating in the Baghdad Flight Information Region, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has extended its Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) prohibiting certain flights at altitudes below 32,000 feet for an additional two years. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the  Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iraq.

If you decide to travel to Iraq:

  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Iraq.
  • Visit the CDC website for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist
Posted: April 24, 2024, 12:00 am

Updated with information about land border travel restrictions.

Exercise increased caution in Ecuador due to civil unrestcrime, and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarqui Avenue, due to crime.
  • The cities of Huaquillas and Arenillas in the province of El Oro, due to crime.
  • The cities of Quevedo, Quinsaloma, and Pueblo Viejo in the province of Los Rios, due to crime.
  • The canton of Duran, in the province of Guayas, due to crime.
  • Esmeraldas city and all areas north of Esmeraldas city in Esmeraldas province, due to crime.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Guayaquil north of Portete de Tarqui Avenue due to crime.
  • El Oro province outside the cities of Huaquillas and Arenillas, due to crime.
  • Los Rios province outside the cities of Quevedo, Quinsaloma, and Pueblo Viejo, due to crime.
  • All areas south of Esmeraldas city in Esmeraldas province, due to crime.
  • The provinces of Sucumbios, Manabi, Santa Elena, and Santo Domingo due to crime.

Country Summary: Crime is a widespread problem in Ecuador. Violent crime, such as murder, assault, kidnapping, and armed robbery, is prevalent and widespread. The rate of violent crime is significantly higher in areas where transnational criminal organizations are concentrated.

Demonstrations occur frequently throughout the country, usually motivated by political and/or economic factors. Demonstrators routinely block local roads and major highways, often without prior notice which can lead to disruption in access to critical infrastructure.  

Outside of Ecuador’s major towns and cities, much of the country’s territory is sparsely populated and isolated. Government assistance may be very limited and can lead to significant delays for assistance to U.S. citizens in remote areas.

Land Border Restrictions: All foreign citizens entering the country via land border crossings from Colombia or Peru are required to present an apostilled certificate showing a lack of criminal record. Further information is available on the Ministry of Tourism’s webpage and at Ecuador.Travel. All U.S. citizens planning to enter Ecuador via a land border should comply with this requirement. See Travel.State.Gov’s Office of Authentications webpage and Criminal Records Check webpage for information on how to obtain a criminal record check and apostille from the United States. The U.S. Embassy and Consulate General in Ecuador cannot assist citizens crossing a land border in obtaining the required documentation.    

Read the country information page for additional information on traveling to Ecuador.

If you decide to travel to Ecuador:

Level 4: Do Not Travel

Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarqui Avenue, due to crime.

The cities of Huaquillas and Arenillas in the Province of El Oro, due to crime.

The cities of Quevedo, Quinsaloma, and Pueblo Viejo in the province of Los Rios, due to crime.

The canton of Duran, in the province of Guayas, due to crime.

Esmeraldas city and all areas north of Esmeraldas city in Esmeraldas province, due to crime.

Transnational criminal groups and local gangs regularly engage in violent criminal acts in these areas, including indiscriminate attacks without warning in public spaces. Violent crimes have included murder, targeted assassinations, armed robberies, bombings, kidnappings, and assaults, among others. Violence in these areas has steadily increased in frequency and brutality in recent months, posing an increased security risk to U.S. citizens. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling to these areas without prior authorization. As a result, the U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these areas.

Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Guayaquil north of Portete de Tarqui Avenue, due to crime.

El Oro province outside the cities of Huaquillas and Arenillas, due to crime.

Los Rios province outside the cities of Quevedo, Quinsaloma, and Pueblo Viejo, due to crime.

All areas south of Esmeraldas city in Esmeraldas province, due to crime.

The provinces of Sucumbios, Manabi, Santa Elena, and Santo Domingo, due to crime.

Transnational criminal groups and local gangs have sporadically engaged in violent criminal activity in these areas, with violence increasing in recent months. U.S. government personnel are directed to exercise extreme caution and maintain increased vigilance when traveling in and around these areas. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Posted: April 15, 2024, 12:00 am

Updated due to new national security legislation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

Summary: Reconsider travel to Mainland China due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, including in relation to exit bans, and the risk of wrongful detentions.

Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

Reconsider travel to the Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to a limited ability to provide emergency consular services. Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Macau SAR due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

See specific risks and conditions in each jurisdiction

Posted: April 12, 2024, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.