The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Do not travel to the Central African Republic due to COVID-19, Embassy Bangui’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, and elections.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for the Central African Republic due to COVID-19.  

The Central African Republic has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including schools and restaurants). Other improved conditions have been reported within the Central African Republic. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the Central African Republic.

The presidential election is scheduled for December 27, 2020. Although there have been no specific incidents of violence or threats targeting U.S. citizens, civil unrest, demonstrations, and election-related violence (including renewed outbreaks of armed conflict) may occur throughout the country in the period leading up to, during, and following the election.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, aggravated battery, and homicide is common.

Armed groups control large areas of the country and they regularly kidnap, injure, and/or kill civilians.  In the event of unrest, airport, land border, and road closures may occur with little or no notice.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Central African Republic. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside the Embassy compound. Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in the Central African Republic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Read the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Central African Republic (CAR):

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax)
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Review your personal security plans, be vigilant, and take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Central African Republic (CAR).
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with addition of an “E” risk indicator and updates to “If you decide to travel” section.

 

 

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Seychelles due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Seychelles due to COVID-19. 

Seychelles has resumed some transportation options, but most travelers are barred from entry unless they hold permanent residence or domicile in Seychelles. Seychelles has resumed business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Seychelles. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Seychelles.

Read the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Seychelles:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Saint Lucia due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Saint Lucia due to COVID-19.

St. Lucia has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within St. Lucia. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Saint Lucia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Saint Lucia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Uruguay due to COVID-19 and crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Uruguay due to COVID-19.

Uruguay has resumed limited transportation options (including charter airport operations, some re-opening of borders for Uruguayan citizens and residents) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Uruguay. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Uruguay.

Violent crimes, such as homicides, armed robberies, carjackings, and thefts have increased throughout the country and occur in urban areas frequented by U.S. government personnel, day and night. Criminals commonly travel in pairs on motorcycles to approach unsuspecting victims with a weapon and demand personal belongings. Armed criminals also target grocery stores, restaurants, financial centers, and small businesses, in which innocent bystanders are often victimized.

Please read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Uruguay:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings especially when traveling to tourist locations or poorly lit areas.
  • Call 911 if you encounter a crime in progress. Do not physically resist any robbery attempt or try to stop a robbery in progress.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or using ATMs during non-daylight hours or in remote locations; criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours.
  • Do not leave valuable objects in parked vehicles or in plain sight when driving.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Review your personal and residential security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Uruguay.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations; review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Barbados due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Barbados due to COVID-19.  

Barbados has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders), and businesses operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Barbados. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Barbados.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Barbados:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in New Zealand.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for New Zealand due to COVID-19.  

New Zealand  continues to enforce border restrictions due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to New Zealand:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Samoa due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 Travel Health Notice for Samoa due to COVID-19.  

Samoa has resumed transportation options (including airport operations) and business operations (including day cares and schools). However, inbound travel is significantly restricted and business operating hours remain limited. Other improved conditions have been reported within Samoa. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Samoa.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Samoa:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Nauru due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Nauru due to COVID-19.  

Nauru has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Nauru.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Nauru:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Senegal due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 4 Travel Health Notice for Senegal due to COVID-19.  

Senegal has resumed most transportation options, including international airport operations, and re-opened some land borders. Senegal has normalized many business and government operations including reopening schools. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Senegal.

Exercise Increased Caution In:

  • The Casamance region due to crime and landmines.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Senegal:

Casamance Region--Exercise Increased Caution

Armed individuals have set up roadblocks and attacked travelers on roads south of The Gambia in the Casamance region of Senegal.

Land mines from prior conflicts remain in the Casamance Region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in this area. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travelling on National Route 4 south of Ziguinchor, on Route 20 between Ziguinchor and Cap Skirring, and on unpaved roads without armed escorts. U.S. government employees are also prohibited from travelling after dark.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to the Dominican Republic due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions. 

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for the Dominican Republic due to COVID-19.  

The Dominican Republic has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the Dominican Republic.

Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault is a concern throughout the Dominican Republic. The development of a professional tourist police corps, institution of a 911 system in many parts of the country, and a concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas like Santo Domingo. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality on the broader scale.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Follow the advice of resort and tour operators regarding local safety and security concerns
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for the Dominican Republic.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: November 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.