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The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Exercise increased caution in Saudi Arabia due to terrorism and the threat of missile and drone attacks on civilian targets.

Do not travel to:

Within 50 miles of the border with Yemen due to terrorism and armed conflict.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Saudi Arabia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Terrorists have targeted both Saudi and Western government interests, mosques and other religious sites (both Sunni and Shia), and places frequented by U.S. citizens and other Westerners.

Regional actors hostile to Saudi Arabia have conducted destructive and sometimes lethal attacks against a variety of targets including critical infrastructure, military facilities, airports, and energy facilities throughout the country, as well as vessels in Red Sea shipping lanes. Riyadh, Yanbu, areas in proximity to Jeddah, the civilian airport in Abha, military installations in the south, and specific oil and gas facilities are examples of recent targets. The Islamic Republic of Iran has supplied Yemen-based Houthis and other regional proxy groups with weapons, including drones, missiles, and rockets. Houthi militants continue to plan and conduct attacks against locations in Saudi Arabia. Violence associated with Iran-supported groups represents a significant threat. U.S. citizens living and working near military bases and critical civilian infrastructure, particularly in the Eastern Province and areas near the border with Yemen, are at heightened risk of missile and drone attack.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the following locations, as U.S. Mission personnel and their families are restricted from travel to:

  • Within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border, including the cities of Jizan and Najran, and
  • Qatif in the Eastern province and its suburbs, including Awamiyah.

U.S. Mission personnel and their families are not permitted to use the airport in Abha without Chief of Mission approval.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Saudi Arabia, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Saudi Arabia:

Yemen Border

Violence in Yemen has spilled over into Saudi Arabia on a number of occasions. Rebel forces in Yemen fire artillery at Saudi border towns and launch cross-border attacks against Saudi military personnel. Civilians who are near the border with Yemen are at risk.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border as U.S. government personnel and their families are restricted from travel to this area.

Visit our website for information on travel to high-risk areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to security information.

Posted: September 17, 2019, 12:00 am


Exercise normal precautions in Laos. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

The government of Laos has declared an emergency and requested international assistance in response to severe flooding in the south of Laos. The following provinces are affected: Khammouan, Savannakhet, Saravan, Champassak, Xekong and Attapeu. The flooding has displaced more than 100,000 people and has made many roads inaccessible impeding the government’s ability to deliver aid and medical support. We advise U.S. citizens to reconsider travel to the affected areas until further notice.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Khammouan, Savannakhet, Saravan, Champassak, Xekong, and Attapeu due to severe flooding.
  • Xaisomboun Province due to civil unrest.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Remote areas along the border with Burma due to crime.
  • Areas of Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7 (from Route 13 to the Vietnam border), Route 9 (Savannakhet to the Vietnam border), and Route 20 (Pakse to Saravane) due to unexploded bombs.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Laos:

  • Do not touch unknown metal objects and avoid traveling off well-used roads, tracks, and paths due to risk of unexploded ordnance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Laos.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Xaisomboun Province

There is a continued threat of violence in Xaisomboun Province. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Xiasomboun Province as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel there.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas on the Border with Burma

Bandits, drug traffickers, and other people pursuing illegal activities operate in these areas, as do armed groups opposed to the Burmese government.

Areas of Savannakhet, Xieng Khouang, Saravane, Khammouane, Sekong, Champassak, Houaphan, Attapeu, Luang Prabang, and Vientiane provinces, as well as along Route 7

There are large numbers of unexploded bombs in these areas left over from the Indochina War.

Last Update: Reissued for information on flooding in southern Laos. 

Posted: September 16, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Norway.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Norway:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: September 13, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Hong Kong due to civil unrest.

Since June 2019, several large scale and smaller political demonstrations have taken place in various areas of Hong Kong, including the international airport. Most have been peaceful, but some have resulted in violent confrontations between the police and protesters.  Police have used a variety of crowd control measures, including the deployment of tear gas, rubber bullets, and water cannons.  Protesters have started fires and thrown projectiles at the police.  The protests and confrontations have spilled over into neighborhoods other than those where the police have permitted marches or rallies. These demonstrations, which can take place with little or no notice, are likely to continue.

Recently, U.S. citizens, as well as U.S. Consulate General employees, have been subject to a People’s Republic of China propaganda campaign falsely accusing the United States of fomenting unrest in Hong Kong.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Hong Kong:

  • Monitor local media for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Review your flight status with your airlines or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Hong Kong.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: September 6, 2019

Posted: September 6, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution when traveling to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Areas near the Syrian and Iraqi borders due to terrorism. (Level 4)

Reconsider travel to:

  • Batman, Bingol, Bitlis, Diyarbakir, Gaziantep, Hakkari, Hatay, Kilis, Mardin, Sanliurfa, Siirt, Sirnak, Tunceli, and Van (Level 3)

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas. Terrorists have also previously targeted Western tourists and expatriates.

Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government, including on social media, can result in arrest.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Stay at hotels with identifiable security measures.
  • Monitor local media and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Turkey.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Areas near the Syrian and Iraqi Borders – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel near the Turkey/Syria and Turkey/Iraq borders due to the continued threat of attacks by terrorist groups, armed conflict, and civil unrest. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, and illegal roadblocks leading to violence have occurred in these areas.

Specific Areas in Eastern and Southeastern Turkey – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to specific areas in eastern and southeastern Turkey where the U.S. government has very limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. These areas are the provinces of Batman, Bingol, Bitlis, Diyarbakir, Gaziantep, Hakkari, Hatay, Kilis, Mardin, Sanliurfa, Siirt, Sirnak, Tunceli, and Van, as the U.S. government restricts its employees from traveling to these provinces without prior approval.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with updates to a risk indicator and the Travel Advisory Level.

Posted: September 5, 2019, 12:00 am

Freeport, Grand Bahama – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Exercise increased caution in Freeport, Grand Bahama due to Hurricane Dorian.

On August 29, The Department of State ordered non-emergency personnel and family members of U.S. government employees to depart Freeport, Grand Bahama in The Bahamas in advance of Hurricane Dorian.

If you decide to travel to The Bahamas:

  • Exercise caution in the area known as "Over the Hill" (south of Shirley Street) and the Fish Fry at Arawak Cay in Nassau, especially at night.
  • Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for The Bahamas.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency and medical situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

The Bahamas – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution in the Bahamas due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime, such as burglaries, armed robberies, and sexual assault, occurs even during the day and in tourist areas. Although the family islands are not crime-free, the vast majority of crime occurs on New Providence and Grand Bahama islands. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to visit the area known by many visitors as the Sand Trap area in Nassau due to crime. Activities involving commercial recreational watercraft, including water tours, are not consistently regulated. Watercrafts are often not maintained, and many companies do not have safety certifications to operate in The Bahamas. Jet-ski operators have been known to commit sexual assaults against tourists. As a result, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to use jet-ski rentals on New Providence and Paradise Islands.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

Last Update: Reissued for information on Hurricane Dorian.

Posted: August 30, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Andorra. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Andorra:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: August 27, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Chile.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Chile:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with no updates 

Posted: August 23, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Malawi due to civil unrest.

Scheduled political demonstrations have recently occurred in several cities and towns in Malawi. On occasion, acts of vandalism and looting have accompanied these demonstrations, and police have responded by deploying tear gas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Malawi:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Malawi.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to a Risk Indicator and Travel Advisory level.

Posted: August 22, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Hungary. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Hungary:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: August 22, 2019, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.