The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Reconsider travel to Democratic Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19, crime, civil unrest and Ebola. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Democratic Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19.  

Democratic Republic of the Congo has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Democratic Republic of the Congo. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Democratic Republic of the Congo. 

Do Not Travel To:

  • North Kivu province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, Ebola, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • Ituri province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • The eastern DRC region and the three Kasai provinces (Kasai, Kasai-Oriental, Kasai-Central) due to crime, civil unrest, armed conflict and kidnapping.

 Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, armed home invasion, and assault, is common and local police lack resources to respond effectively to serious crime. Assailants may pose as police or security agents.

Demonstrations are common in many cities and some have turned violent. Police have at times responded with heavy-handed tactics that resulted in civilian casualties and arrests.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens outside of Kinshasa due to poor infrastructure and security conditions.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo:

North Kivu Province--Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout North Kivu province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in North Kivu province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

The province of North Kivu is experiencing an Ebola virus outbreak, with confirmed and probable cases reported. The CDC issued a Level 3 Travel Notice for Ebola in DRC, its highest level. Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in North Kivu province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ituri Province--Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout Ituri province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in Ituri province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Ituri province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Eastern DRC Region and the Three Kasai Provinces--Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout South Kivu, Tanganyika, Haut Lomami, Bas-Uele, and Haut-Uele and three Kasai provinces of Kasai Oriental, Kasai Central, and Kasai. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in eastern DRC and these provinces, as U.S. government travel to these regions is restricted. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to Ebola information.

Posted: February 25, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Guinea due to COVID-19 and Ebola. Exercise increased caution in Guinea due to civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Guinea due to COVID-19.

Guinea has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Guinea. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Guinea.

Do Not Travel To:

  • N’Zerekore region due to Ebola.

Country Summary: Demonstrations occur frequently throughout the country and are often sporadic and unplanned, making it difficult to predict the size, route, or level of violence or congestion that may occur.

Any demonstration may turn violent, resulting in injuries and even fatalities. Demonstrators may attack vehicles that attempt to pass through or around the protests, resulting in serious injuries and vehicular damage. Criminals are known to take advantage of the resulting traffic congestion to rob drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Uniformed security forces may also extort drivers and passengers during these incidents.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Guinea:

N’Zerekore Region: Level 4 – Do Not Travel

Southeastern Guinea is experiencing an Ebola virus outbreak, with confirmed cases in N’Zerekore region. The CDC issued a Level 3 Travel Notice for Ebola in Guinea.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to Ebola Information.

Posted: February 25, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Kyrgyzstan due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Kyrgyzstan due to lack of available COVID-19 data.

Land borders remain closed and only limited flights are available. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kyrgyzstan.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Kyrgyz Republic:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Cyprus due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Cyprus due to COVID-19.

Most transportation options (such as airports and land/sea borders) are open. Businesses are operating, although some restrictions may be in place. Quarantine measures or entry restrictions are in place for certain U.S. citizen travelers. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Cyprus.

Do not attempt to enter the United Nations buffer zone at any place other than a designated crossing point. Police and UN forces strictly enforce this restriction.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Cyprus:

UN Buffer Zone: Since 1974, the southern part of Cyrus has been under the control of the government of the Republic of Cyprus. The northern part of Cyprus, administered by Turkish Cypriots, proclaimed itself the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (“TRNC”) in 1983. The United States does not recognize the “TRNC,” nor does any country other than Turkey. A buffer zone patrolled by the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, separates the two sides. For U.S. citizen travelers:

  • Enter and exit the Republic of Cyprus ONLY at Larnaca and Paphos airports and at the seaports of Limassol, Larnaca, and Paphos. The Republic of Cyprus does not consider entry at Ercan Airport in the north to be a “legal” entrance into Cyprus.
  • You cannot receive a residency permit from the Republic of Cyprus to reside in the area north of the UN buffer zone.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Algeria due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Algeria due to terrorism.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Algeria due to lack of available COVID-19 data. Algeria has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Algeria.

Do not travel to:

  • Areas near the eastern and southern borders due to terrorism and kidnapping.
  • Areas in the Sahara Desert due to terrorism and kidnapping.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Algeria. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning and have recently targeted the Algerian security forces. Most attacks take place in rural areas, but attacks are possible in urban areas despite a heavy and active police presence.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside Algiers province due to Algerian government restrictions on travel by U.S. government employees.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Algeria:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Inform local police when visiting locations outside of major cities.
  • Travel by air if possible; remain on major highways if you must travel by road.
  • Travel with reputable travel agents who know the area.
  • Avoid staying overnight outside of the main cities and tourist locations.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Algeria.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Eastern and southern borders — Do Not Travel

Avoid travel to rural areas within 50 km (31 miles) of the border with Tunisia and within 250 km (155 miles) of the borders with Libya, Niger, Mali, and Mauritania due to terrorist and criminal activities, including kidnapping.

Visit our website for High-Risk Travelers.

Overland travel to the Sahara Desert — Do Not Travel

Do not travel overland in the Sahara Desert due to terrorist and criminal activity, including kidnapping.

Visit our website for High-Risk Travelers.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Nepal due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Nepal due to the potential for isolated political violence.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Nepal due to COVID-19. 

Nepal has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Nepal.

Political demonstrations intended to be peaceful can sometimes escalate into violence and may be met with force by Nepali authorities.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Nepal: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Grenada due to health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Grenada due to COVID-19.

Grenada has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Grenada. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Grenada.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Grenada:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Tanzania due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Tanzania due to crime, terrorism, and targeting of LGBTI persons.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for the Tanzania due to COVID-19. CDC compliant testing for COVID-19 is either not available or results are not always available within 3 calendar days of testing. Travelers should expect delays returning to the U.S.

For the duration of the pandemic, Tanzania has not implemented stay at home orders, nor limited transportation options or business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Tanzania.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania due to the threat of terrorism.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as assault, sexual assault, robberies, mugging, and carjacking, is common. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Terrorist groups could attack in Tanzania with little or no warning, targeting embassies, police stations, mosques, and other places frequented by Westerners. Please see the additional information below regarding the increased threat of terrorism in Mtwara Region.

Members of the LGBTI community have been arrested, targeted, harassed, and/or charged with unrelated offenses. Individuals detained under suspicion of same-sex sexual conduct could be subject to forced anal examinations.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Tanzania:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa and keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not leave your food or drink unattended.
  • Stay alert in all locations, especially those frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid public displays of affection particularly between same-sex couples.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Tanzania.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania – Reconsider Travel

There have been reports of violence in Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania. Increased activity by extremists along the southern border has led to attacks against both government and civilian targets.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Do not travel to South Sudan due to COVID-19, crime, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for South Sudan due to COVID-19.

Travelers to South Sudan may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within South Sudan due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in South Sudan.

Violent crime, such as carjackings, shootings, ambushes, assaults, robberies, and kidnappings is common throughout South Sudan, including Juba. Foreign nationals have been the victims of rape, sexual assault, armed robberies, and other violent crimes.

Armed conflict is ongoing and includes fighting between various political and ethnic groups. Weapons are readily available to the population. In addition, cattle raids occur throughout the country and often lead to violence.

Reporting in South Sudan without the proper documentation from the South Sudanese Media Authority is considered illegal, and any journalistic work there is very dangerous. Journalists regularly report being harassed in South Sudan, and many have been killed while covering the conflict.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in South Sudan. U.S. government personnel in South Sudan are under a strict curfew. They must use armored vehicles for nearly all movements, and official travel outside Juba is limited. Due to the critical crime threat in Juba, walking is also restricted; when allowed, it is limited to a small area in the immediate vicinity of the Embassy and during daylight hours only. Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in South Sudan.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of South Sudan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to South Sudan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Exercise extreme care in all parts of the country, including Juba. Travel outside of Juba with a minimum of two vehicles along with appropriate recovery and medical equipment in case of mechanical failure or other emergency.
  • Avoid travel along border areas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and public gatherings. Even events intended to be peaceful can become violent.
  • Be aware that photography in public is strictly controlled and you are required to obtain authorization from the Ministry of Information before taking any photographs or video in public – including while inside a vehicle.
  • Monitor local/international news and consular messages.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our page on travel to high risk areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, log-in information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Your plan should include sheltering in place, maintaining outside communication, and a personal evacuation plan via commercial means.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for South Sudan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Chad due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, and minefields.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Chad due to COVID-19.

Chad has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Chad. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Chad.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, and muggings, have occurred in Chad.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreigners, local security forces, and civilians. They can easily cross borders, including in the Lake Chad region; borders may close without notice.

There are unmapped and undocumented minefields along the borders with both Libya and Sudan.

The U.S. Government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Chad as U.S. Government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital, including the Lake Chad Basin.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Chad:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: February 22, 2021, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.