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The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Reconsider travel to Burundi due to crime, health, and political violence.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as grenade attacks and armed robbery, occur frequently. Though Westerners are unlikely to be targeted, the risk of being in the wrong place at the wrong time is high. Local police lack the resources and training to respond effectively to crimes.

Medical services in Burundi fall well below U.S. standards, and there are no adequate trauma services in the country. Emergency medical and fire services are limited or non-existent in some areas of the country. The CDC has also issued a Level 1 Travel Notice on Malaria in Burundi.

There are ongoing political tensions in Burundi, causing sporadic violence throughout the country. Police and military checkpoints are common and can restrict freedom of movement. Police have conducted weapon searches in the homes of private citizens. In the provinces of Cibitoke and Bubanza, near the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda, as well as Mutimbuzi commune in Bujumbura Rural province, there have been armed attacks primarily conducted by groups operating from the eastern DRC. The border may close without notice.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens throughout Burundi. U.S. embassy personnel are subject to restrictions when traveling in certain areas of Burundi and may be subject to other constraints as security conditions warrant. These restrictions include limitations on travel outside of Bujumbura during hours of darkness (typically 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.) and prior approval for travel to the Bujumbura neighborhoods of Buyenzi, Bwiza, Cibitoke, Gasenyi, Kamenge, Kinama, Musaga, Mutakura, and Ngagara.

Due to travel restrictions on U.S. Embassy personnel, the U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the following areas: the provinces of Bubanza and Cibitoke, Kibira National Park (including the park’s southernmost part in Muramvya province), and Ruvubu and Buriri Forest. Embassy personnel are also prohibited from transiting through Kibira National Park to reach Kayanza via the RN-10.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Burundi:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Read the CDC Travel Notice on Malaria in Burundi.
  • Visit the CDC Travelers’ Health Page for Burundi.
  • Bring a sufficient supply of over-the-counter and prescription medicines.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Avoid areas where there are large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations, and exercise caution in the vicinity of any such gatherings.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings and be vigilant when traveling in unfamiliar areas or outside of cities and along border areas; take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security.
  • Consider traveling in pairs and using convoys of multiple vehicles to mitigate the risks related to traveling outside of Bujumbura. Carry additional fuel, spare tires, and provisions. Include a satellite phone, map, navigation equipment, and first aid kit. Service stations are scarce in rural areas. Professional roadside assistance service is not available outside the capital.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Burundi.
  • Prepare contingency plans for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with updates to the Risk Indicators, U.S. government restrictions on personnel, and “If you decide to travel” section.

Posted: January 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Australia. Areas affected by bushfires have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution in areas affected by bushfires and air quality issues

  • Visitors should exercise increased caution when considering travel to areas affected by bushfires until the risks posed by bushfires, and resulting poor air quality, have passed.
  • Authorities may issue evacuation orders to certain areas as conditions warrant. Travelers should follow local evacuation orders.
  • Smoke from bushfires is causing poor air quality, which can increase health risks for travelers with related health conditions. Check the air quality for your destinations and take precautions as needed.
  • Monitor local news media outlets for updates on areas under evacuation.
  • Dial 000 (triple zero) for immediate assistance from the police, ambulance service, or fire brigade.

For the latest information on affected areas, please see the notices and updates of the state or territory emergency services where you are:

Fire Services:

Air quality

Posted: January 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Serbia due to crime.

Violence associated with organized crime and high-profile sporting events in Serbia is common.

Organized criminal activities such as car bombings and assassinations by shooting can occur in all areas at any time.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Serbia:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave the original in your hotel safe.
  • Provide your itinerary to a family member or friend.
  • Monitor local media.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Serbia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review with edits.

Posted: January 16, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Montenegro. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Montenegro:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: January 15, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Timor-Leste due to crime and civil unrest.  

Country Summary: Timor-Leste has seen isolated instances of police responding to protests with force and the use of tear gas. Stone throwing attacks on vehicles can occur during gang conflicts and periods of unrest. Gender-based violence is high in Timor-Leste, and sexual harassment is fairly common.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Timor-Leste:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to the Travel Advisory Level and information on the Crime and Civil Unrest Risk Indicators.

Posted: January 15, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Slovenia. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Slovenia:

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: January 15, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Italy due to terrorism

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Italy. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Italy:

  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Italy.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review without changes.

Posted: January 15, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Brazil due to crime.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Any areas within 150 km/100 miles of Brazil’s land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay due to crime. (Note:  This does not apply to the Foz do Iguacu National Park or Pantanal National Park.)
  • Informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, comunidades, and/or conglomerados) at any time of day due to crime (see additional information below).
  • Brasilia’s administrative regions (commonly known as “satellite cities”) of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa during non-daylight hours due to crime (see additional information below).

Country Summary:  Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, and carjacking, is common in urban areas, day and night.  Gang activity and organized crime is widespread.  Assaults are common.  U.S. government personnel are discouraged from using public, municipal buses in all parts of Brazil due to an elevated risk of robbery and assault at any time of day, and especially at night.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Brazil:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid walking on beaches after dark. 
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Use caution at, or going to, major transportation centers or on public transportation, especially at night.  Passengers face an elevated risk of robbery or assault using public, municipal bus transportation throughout Brazil.  
  • Use increased caution when hiking in isolated areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Brazil.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

International Borders – Level 4: Do Not Travel

U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to areas within 150 km/100 miles of the international land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay without advance approval from security officials due to crime.  Travel to the Foz do Iguacu National Park and Pantanal National Park is permitted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

 

Informal Housing Developments (commonly known as “Favelas”) – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, comunidades, and/or conglomerados), even on a guided tour.  Neither the tour companies nor the police can guarantee your safety when entering these communities.  Even in these communities that the police or local governments deem safe, the situation can change quickly and without notice.  While some informal housing developments have clear boundaries or gates, or even names such as “favela”, “vila”, “comunidade”, or “conglomerado”, other such developments may be less obvious, and may be identified by crowded quarters, poorer conditions, and/or irregular construction.  In addition, exercise caution in areas surrounding these communities, as occasionally, inter-gang fighting and confrontations with police move beyond the confines of these communities.  Except under limited circumstances and with advance approval, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to enter any informal housing developments in Brazil. Read the Safety and Security Section on the country information page for further information regarding favelas.

Visit our website for Travel High-Risk Areas.

Brasilia’s Administrative Regions (commonly known as “Satellite Cities”) – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Without advance approval from security officials, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to Brasilia’s Administrative Regions of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. (non-daylight hours) due to crime.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review with updates to Level 4 areas and U.S. government restrictions on personnel.

Posted: January 14, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Canada.

Read the Safety and Security section on the Country Information page.

If you decide to travel to Canada:

Last Update:   Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Posted: January 14, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Poland. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Poland:

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Posted: January 14, 2020, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.