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The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Reconsider travel to Israel and the West Bank due to COVID-19, travel restrictions, and quarantine procedures instituted by the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority respectively. Exercise increased caution in Israel and the West Bank due to terrorism and civil unrest. Do not travel to Gaza due to COVID-19, terrorism, civil unrest, and armed conflict.  

Some areas have increased risk. Read the county information page and this entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Israel due to COVID-19.   

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. 

Terrorist groups and lone-wolf terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Violence can occur in Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza without warning. There has been a marked increase in demonstrations throughout Israel, some with little or no warning.  

West Bank: U.S. government travel throughout the West Bank is extremely limited. Visit our website for Travel to High Risk Areas

Gaza:  The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Gaza as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling there and are restricted from traveling close to the Gaza demarcation line.  Hamas, a U.S. government-designated foreign terrorist organization, controls the security infrastructure in Gaza. The security environment within Gaza and on its borders is dangerous and volatile. Sporadic mortar or rocket fire and corresponding Israeli military responses may occur at any time. During periods of unrest or armed conflict, the crossings between Gaza with Israel and Egypt may be closed.

Visit our website for Travel to High Risk Areas.

If you decide to travel to Israel and/or the West Bank:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's COVID-19 page.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.  
  • Have a plan to depart Israel and the West Bank, which does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Carry additional supplies of necessary medication in carry-on luggage due to quarantine restrictions. 
  • Check the most recent Alerts at the Embassy website for the latest information on travel in all of these areas. 
  • Maintain a high degree of situational awareness and exercise caution at all times, especially at checkpoints and other areas with a significant presence of security forces.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Follow the instructions of security and emergency response officials.
  • Beware of and report suspicious activities, including unattended items, to local police.
  • Learn the location of the nearest bomb shelter or other hardened shelter. Download the Home Front Command Red Alert application for mobile devices to receive real time alerts for rocket attacks.  
  • Obtain comprehensive travel medical insurance that includes medical evacuation prior to travel. Most travel insurance packages do not cover mental health related illnesses/care. 
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) Crime and Safety Report for Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. 
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to Safety and Security information.  

Posted: September 23, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Egypt due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Egypt due to terrorism and the Embassy’s limited ability to assist dual national U.S.-Egyptian citizens who are arrested or detained.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Egypt due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

Egypt has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Egypt.

Do not travel to:

  • The Sinai Peninsula (with the exception of travel to Sharm El-Sheikh by air) due to terrorism.
  • The Western Desert due to terrorism.
  • Egyptian border areas due to military zones.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Egypt. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, and have targeted diplomatic facilities, tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, western businesses, restaurants, resorts, and local government facilities. Terrorists have conducted attacks in urban areas, including in Cairo, despite the heavy security presence. Terrorists have targeted religious sites, to include mosques, churches, monasteries, and buses traveling to these locations.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Egypt, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Local law prohibits protesting or demonstrating without a permit. Being near anti-government protests can draw scrutiny from Egyptian police and security forces. U.S. citizens have been detained for participating in protests and for posting content on social media perceived as critical of Egypt or its allies.

The U.S. Embassy may have a limited ability to provide consular services to dual U.S.-Egyptian citizens. Egyptian law considers dual citizens to be Egyptian citizens.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Egypt:

Sinai Peninsula - Do Not Travel

The Sinai Peninsula remains a particularly dangerous area, with frequent attacks on security forces and civilians.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens anywhere in the Sinai Peninsula as U.S. government employees are not authorized to travel to these areas (with the exception of the beach resort of Sharm El-Sheikh; travel to Sharm El-Sheikh is only permitted by air).

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: September 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Equatorial Guinea due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Equatorial Guinea due to COVID-19.

Equatorial Guinea has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Equatorial Guinea. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Equatorial Guinea.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Equatorial Guinea:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: September 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Nigeria due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and maritime crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Nigeria due to COVID-19.      

Nigeria has resumed domestic and international commercial air travel. National land borders are not yet opened.  Business operations (including daycares and religious institutions) are slowly reopening in phases. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Nigeria.

Do Not Travel to:

  • Borno and Yobe States and Northern Adamawa State due to terrorism
  • Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, and Yobe states due to kidnapping
  • Coastal areas of Akwa Ibom, Bayelsa, Cross Rivers, Delta, and Rivers states (with the exception of Port Harcourt) due to crime, civil unrest, kidnapping, and maritime crime

Country Summary: Violent crime – such as armed robbery, assault, carjacking, kidnapping, and rape – is common throughout the country. Exercise extreme caution throughout the country due to the threat of indiscriminate violence.

Terrorists continue plotting and carrying out attacks in Nigeria, especially in the Northeast. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting shopping centers, malls, markets, hotels, places of worship, restaurants, bars, schools, government installations, transportation hubs, and other places where crowds gather.

Sporadic violence occurs between communities of farmers and herders in rural areas. 

There is maritime crime in the Gulf of Guinea.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Nigeria due to security conditions.

Read the country information page. 

If you decide to travel to Nigeria:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.  
  • Carry proper identification, including a U.S. passport with a current Nigerian visa if needed.
  • Exercise caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Review travel routes and times to vary your predictability.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events, and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid demonstrations and large political gatherings.
  • Review your personal security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Nigeria. 
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist

Borno and Yobe states and Northern Adamawa State – Do Not Travel

Terrorist groups based in the Northeast target churches, schools, mosques, government installations, educational institutions, and entertainment venues. Approximately two million Nigerians have been displaced as a result of the violence in Northeast Nigeria. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Adamawa, Bauchi, Borno, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, and Yobe states – Do Not Travel

The security situation in Northwest and Northeast Nigeria is fluid and unpredictable, particularly in the states listed above due to widespread inter-communal violence and kidnapping.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coastal areas of Akwa Ibom, Bayelsa, Cross Rivers, Delta, and Rivers states (with the exception of Port Harcourt) – Do Not Travel

Crime is rampant throughout Southern Nigeria, and there is a heightened risk of kidnapping and maritime crime, along with violent civil unrest and attacks against expatriate oil workers and facilities.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: September 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Ghana due to COVID-19

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.     

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Ghana due to COVID-19.    

Ghana has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders), and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Ghana.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Urban areas due to crime.
  • Intercity highways after dark due to crime.
  • Areas near the northern border in the Upper East and Upper West regions due to crime.
  • Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East regions due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Ghana:

Urban Areas – Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime, such as street mugging, is more frequent in urban areas as compared to their surrounding suburbs. These crimes are also more prevalent at night and in isolated locations.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to more serious crimes.

Intercity Highways After Dark – Exercise Increased Caution

Armed assaults on private vehicles and public transports occur more frequently after dark, often by criminal elements using blockades to slow down and restrict movement of vehicles.

Areas Near the Northern Border in the Upper East and Upper West Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

U.S. citizens traveling in Ghana should exercise caution while visiting border areas, in particular the northern border, and be sure to stay abreast of any regional Travel Advisory updates or Security Alerts affecting those areas.

Parts of the Bono East, Bono, Savannah, Northern, North East, and Upper East Regions – Exercise Increased Caution

Civil unrest due to tribal disputes can occur at any time.  While such disputes are typically non-violent, the likelihood for violence developing from a tribal dispute is greater in parts of these regions.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information. 

Posted: September 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Fiji due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

Fiji has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Fiji. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Fiji.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Fiji:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 
Posted: September 21, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Kuwait due to COVID-19. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Kuwait due to COVID-19.  

Kuwait has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations) and business operations (including schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Kuwait. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Kuwait.

Do not travel to:

  • The desert region near the border with Iraq due to the prevalence of unexploded ordnance.

Exercise increased caution:

  • The Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh area in Kuwait City due to crime.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Kuwait, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Kuwait:

Desert Region North of the Mutla’a Ridge and Near the Border with Iraq – Do Not Travel

Desert areas and certain beaches north of the Mutla’a Ridge continue to contain unexploded ordnance left over from the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Travelers should avoid areas that are “off the beaten path” and avoid touching objects that are potentially unexploded ordnance.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh – Exercise Increased Caution

The Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior has identified the neighborhood of Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh on the outskirts of Kuwait International Airport as a high-crime area.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to information on crime.

Posted: September 17, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to South Africa due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in South Africa due to crime, civil unrest, health, and drought.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for South Africa due to COVID-19.  

South Africa has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in South Africa.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, rape, carjacking, mugging, and "smash-and-grab" attacks on vehicles, is common. There is a higher risk of violent crime in the central business districts of major cities after dark.

Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently. These can develop quickly without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent.

Parts of South Africa are experiencing a drought. Water supplies in some areas may be affected. Residential water-use restrictions are in place in Cape Town and other municipalities. Read the country information page.

Please see our Alerts for up-to-date information.

If you decide to travel to South Africa:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to drought information.

 
Posted: September 15, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Mongolia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Mongolia due to COVID-19.

Mongolia has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some in-country transportation options and business operations. However, Mongolia maintains an almost total ban on the entry of foreigners and has limited incoming air traffic to government-controlled charter flights. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mongolia.

Read the country information page.  

If you travel to Mongolia, you should:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Posted: September 14, 2020, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC), including the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), due to COVID-19 and arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for the PRC and Hong Kong due to COVID-19.

The PRC has resumed most business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within the PRC. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in the PRC.

Effective March 28, 2020, the PRC suspended entry into mainland China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits. On August 10, 2020, this ban was modified to allow entry of some nationals, not including the United States. Most commercial air carriers have reduced routes to and from mainland China.

The Hong Kong SAR has resumed most transportation and business operations. Other improved conditions have been reported within Hong Kong. Visit the Consulate General's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Hong Kong. 

Please monitor the Hong Kong government’s website for further updates on COVID-19.

Country Summary:

The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including by carrying out arbitrary and wrongful detentions and through the use of exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without due process of law. The PRC government uses arbitrary detention and exit bans: 

  • to compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • to pressure family members to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • to influence PRC authorities to resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • to gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC or Hong Kong, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government.

The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality. U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC government may prevent the U.S. Embassy from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of national security legislation on July 1, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in Hong Kong. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and “collusion” with foreign countries. The new legislation also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in Hong Kong.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On July 1, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now bring criminal charges.

U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals of fomenting unrest in Hong Kong. In some cases, the campaign, has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and for Hong Kong.

If you decide to travel to Hong Kong:

  • Monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Review your flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Hong Kong.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates on COVID-19 and China’s implementation of a national security law in Hong Kong.

Posted: September 14, 2020, 12:00 am

Check out additional information on our travel page.