The latest news on Energy from the US Energy information administration
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In 2020, fossil fuel production in the United States declined by an estimated 6% from the 2019 record high of 81.3 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu). Based on forecasts in the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) January 2021 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA expects total production of fossil fuels in the United States to remain flat in 2021 as increased coal production offsets declines in natural gas production. EIA expects production of all fossil fuels—crude oil, coal, dry natural gas, and natural gas plant liquids (NGPL)—to increase in 2022, but forecast fossil fuel production will remain lower than the 2019 peak.
Posted: January 15, 2021, 12:00 pm
In its January 2020 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts that annual U.S. crude oil production will average 11.1 million b/d in 2021, down 0.2 million b/d from 2020 as result of a decline in drilling activity related to low oil prices. A production decline in 2021 would mark the second consecutive year of production declines. Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic led to supply and demand disruptions. EIA expects crude oil production to increase in 2022 by 0.4 million b/d because of increased drilling as prices remain at or near $50 per barrel (b).
Posted: January 14, 2021, 12:00 pm
In its January 2021 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts that the annual natural gas spot price at the Henry Hub will rise 0.98¢ per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to average $3.01/MMBtu in 2021. EIA expects higher natural gas prices will prompt dry natural gas production to increase in the second half of 2021, after reaching a monthly low of 87.3 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in March 2021. On an annual basis, EIA forecasts that dry natural gas production will decline from an average of 90.8 Bcf/d in 2020 to 88.2 Bcf/d in 2021. Since early 2020, natural gas production has fallen amid low natural gas and crude oil prices.
Posted: January 1, 1970, 12:00 am
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) latest inventory of electric generators, 9.1 gigawatts (GW) of electric generating capacity is scheduled to retire in 2021. Nuclear generating capacity will account for the largest share of total capacity retirements (56%), followed by coal (30%).
Posted: January 12, 2021, 1:00 pm
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) latest inventory of electricity generators, developers and power plant owners plan for 39.7 gigawatts (GW) of new electricity generating capacity to start commercial operation in 2021. Solar will account for the largest share of new capacity at 39%, followed by wind at 31%. About 3% of the new capacity will come from the new nuclear reactor at the Vogtle power plant in Georgia.
Posted: January 11, 2021, 1:00 pm