Retirement and Good Living

 Finance, Health, Retirement Locations, Volunteering and more...
Retirement And Good Living  
 
Follow us on Twitter at RetirementSite

 

Like us on Facebook at Retirementsite

Warnings and Alerts


Share this post/page...FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedInEmail   

The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Exercise normal precautions in Suriname.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Suriname:

Posted: October 19, 2018, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in South Africa due to crime, civil unrest, and drought.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, rape, carjacking, mugging, and "smash-and-grab" attacks on vehicles, is common. There is a higher risk of violent crime in the central business districts of major cities after dark.

Demonstrations, protests, and strikes occur frequently. These can develop quickly without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent.

South Africa’s Western, Eastern, and Northern Cape Provinces are experiencing a severe drought. Water supplies in some areas may be affected. Residential water-use restrictions are in place in Cape Town and other municipalities. Please see links below for current information.

Please see our Alerts for up-to-date information.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to South Africa:

Posted: October 19, 2018, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Iraq due to terrorism and armed conflict

U.S. citizens in Iraq are at high risk for violence and kidnapping. Numerous terrorist and insurgent groups are active in Iraq and regularly attack both Iraqi security forces and civilians. Anti-U.S. sectarian militias may also threaten U.S. citizens and Western companies throughout Iraq. Attacks by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) occur frequently in many areas of the country, including Baghdad.

The U.S. government’s ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens in Iraq is extremely limited.  On October 18, 2018, the Department of State ordered the temporary suspension of operations at the U.S. Consulate General in Basrah.  The American Citizens Services (ACS) Section at the U.S. Embassy Baghdad will continue to provide consular services to U.S. citizens in Basrah.

U.S. citizens should not travel through Iraq to Syria to engage in armed conflict, where they would face extreme personal risks (kidnapping, injury, or death) and legal risks (arrest, fines, and expulsion). The Kurdistan Regional Government stated that it will impose prison sentences of up to ten years on individuals who illegally cross the border. Additionally, fighting on behalf of, or supporting designated terrorist organizations, is a crime that can result in penalties, including prison time and large fines in the United States. 

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Iraq, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Iraq:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Following us on Twitter and the Bureau of Consular Affairs page on Facebook as well.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Iraq.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

 

Posted: October 18, 2018, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Kiribati. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Kiribati:

Posted: October 18, 2018, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Bulgaria. 

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Bulgaria:

Posted: October 17, 2018, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Burkina Faso due to terrorism.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The northern Sahel border region shared with Mali and Niger due to crime and terrorism.
  • The provinces of Kmoandjari, Tapoa, Kompienga, and Gourma in East Region due to crime and terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Burkina Faso. Terrorists may conduct attacks anywhere with no warning. Targets may include hotels, restaurants, police stations, customs offices, military posts, and schools.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas of the country. Due to the risk of attacks throughout the Sahel and East regions, the U.S. Embassy restricts official government travel to Dori and Djibo, the road that connects these cities, and all areas north of that road, as well as to the provinces of Kmoandjari, Tapoa, Kompienga, and Gourma.

Read the Safety and Security section on the Country Information page

If you decide to travel to Burkina Faso:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Take steps to mitigate the risk of becoming a victim of violence, including limiting trips to locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt. 
  • Review your personal security plans.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings and local events.

The Northern Sahel Border Region

In the northern Sahel border region which borders Mali, Niger, and Burkina Faso, organized criminal groups and terrorists continue plotting kidnappings of Westerners.

Due to the risk of attacks throughout the Sahel region, the U.S. Embassy prohibits personal travel restricts official government travel to Dori and Djibo, the road that connects these cities, and all areas north of that road.

The East Border Region

In the Komondjari, Topa, Kompienga and Gourma provinces adjacent to Niger, Benin, and Togo, terrorist and criminal groups have attacked security and military vehicles with improvised explosive devices (IEDs), destroyed hunting and security force outposts, stolen equipment and vehicles,  destroyed schools, and killed civilians.

The U.S. Embassy prohibits personal travel and restricts official government travel to these provinces.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Posted: October 11, 2018, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Niger due to crime and terrorism.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common.

Terrorist groups continue plotting kidnappings and possible attacks in Niger. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreign and local government facilities and areas frequented by Westerners. Terrorists operate in the areas bordering Mali, Libya, Burkina Faso, and throughout northern Niger. Avoid travel to Niger’s border regions, particularly the Malian border area, Diffa region, and the Lake Chad region. Mali-based extremist groups have crossed the border and conducted multiple lethal attacks on Nigerien security forces.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital, Niamey, due to security concerns. Outside of Niamey, all U.S. Embassy personnel are required to travel only during daylight hours and in a minimum of a two-vehicle convoy accompanied by armed Nigerien government security escorts. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Niger:

  • Visitors are urged to stay in hotels with armed Nigerien security presence.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Niger.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Posted: October 10, 2018, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Iran due to the risk of arbitrary arrest and detention of U.S. citizens.

There is a very high risk of arrest and detention of U.S. citizens in Iran, particularly U.S.-Iranian dual nationals.  

Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. citizens, including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics, on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. U.S.-Iranian dual nationals are particularly susceptible to arrest for these charges. Consular access to detained U.S. citizens is often denied.

The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with Iran. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Iran. Switzerland serves as the protecting power for U.S. citizens in Iran, providing limited emergency services. The Iranian government routinely delays or denies Swiss officials access to detained U.S. citizens. 

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Iran, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Iran:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Review your personal security plan.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
Posted: October 10, 2018, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Central African Republic (CAR) due to crime and civil unrest.

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, aggravated battery, and homicide, is common.

Large areas of the country are controlled by armed groups who regularly kidnap, injure, and/or kill civilians. In the event of unrest, airport, land border, and road closures may occur with little or no notice.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Central African Republic as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside the Embassy compound.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Central African Republic (CAR):

  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress, if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax)
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Central African Republic (CAR).
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

 

Posted: October 3, 2018, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Ukraine due to crime and civil unrest. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Crimea due to arbitrary detentions and other abuses by Russian occupation authorities.
  • The eastern parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts, especially the non-government-controlled areas, due to armed conflict.

Crime targeting foreigners and property is common. Demonstrations, which have turned violent at times, regularly occur throughout Ukraine, including in Kyiv. Politically targeted assassinations and bombings have also occurred. There are reports of violence by extreme nationalist groups.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) prohibits U.S. civil aviation from flying in the Ukrainian Simferopol (UKFV) and Dnipropetrovsk (UKDV) Flight Information Regions. For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Ukraine:

  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Ukraine.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Crimea – Level 4: Do Not Travel

There is extensive Russian Federation military presence in Crimea as part of Russia’s occupation and attempted annexation of this part of Ukraine. Occupation authorities continue to abuse and arbitrarily imprison foreigners and the local population, particularly individuals who are seen as challenging Russian authority on the peninsula.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Crimea as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to Crimea.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Donetsk and Luhansk – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Russia-led forces continue to control areas of the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts, where the ongoing armed conflict has resulted in more than 10,000 deaths. Individuals, including U.S. citizens, have been threatened, detained, or kidnapped for hours or days after being stopped at checkpoints controlled by Russia-led forces.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Donetsk or Luhansk oblasts since U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the eastern parts of the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts and to adjacent regions.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Posted: October 3, 2018, 12:00 am

 

Check out additional information on our travel page.

Please subscribe to our newsletter for the latest posts, news and more
 
About  · Blog  · Contact Us  · Terms of Service


copyright © 2018 by MSI - powered by WordPress