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Warnings and Alerts


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The latest travel warnings and alerts from the government

Reconsider travel to Turkey due to terrorism and arbitrary detentions. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Areas near the Syria and Iraq borders due to terrorism.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Turkey. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas. Terrorists have also previously targeted Western tourists and expatriates.

Security forces have detained tens of thousands of individuals, including U.S. citizens, for alleged affiliations with terrorist organizations based on scant or secret evidence and grounds that appear to be politically motivated. U.S. citizens have also been subject to travel bans that prevent them from departing Turkey. Participation in demonstrations not explicitly approved by the Government of Turkey, as well as criticism of the government, including on social media, can result in arrest.

The U.S. government has very limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Batman, Bingol, Bitlis, Diyarbakir, Gaziantep, Hakkari, Hatay, Kilis, Mardin, Sanliurfa, Siirt, Sirnak, Tunceli, and Van, as the U.S. government restricts its employees from traveling to specific provinces in these regions without prior approval.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Turkey:

  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Stay at hotels with identifiable security measures.
  • Monitor local media and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Turkey.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Areas Near Syrian and Iraq Borders – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel near the Turkey/Syria and Turkey/Iraq borders due to the continued threat of civil war in Syria and attacks by terrorist groups. Terrorist attacks, including suicide bombings, ambushes, car bomb detonations, and improvised explosive devices, as well as shootings, roadblocks, and violent demonstrations have occurred in these areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with edits to information on terrorism and areas near Syrian and Iraq Borders.

Posted: February 14, 2019, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Burkina Faso due to terrorism.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Sahel Region due to crime and terrorism.
  • The East Region due to crime and terrorism.
  • The Provinces of Koulpelogo, Loroum, Yatenga, Sourou, Kossi, Banwa, Kenedougou, or within 50km of the Mali border in Houet Province due to crime and terrorism.
  • To see a map of these regions, click HERE.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks and kidnappings in Burkina Faso, and may conduct attacks anywhere with no warning. Targets could include hotels, restaurants, police stations, customs offices, areas at or near mining sites, military posts, and schools.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas of the country.  Due to the risk of attacks throughout Burkina Faso, the U.S. Embassy restricts official government travel to Ouagadougou’s Arrondissement 11, the Sahel and East regions, as well as the following provinces: Koulpelogo, Loroum, Yatenga, Sourou, Kossi, Banwa, Kenedougou and the area within 50km of the Mali border, in the province of Houet.  

In December 2018, the Government of Burkina Faso declared a six-month state of emergency in the entire East and Sahel regions, the provinces of Kossi and Sourou in the Boucle de Mouhoun region, the province of Kenedougou in the Hauts Bassins region, the province of Loroum in the North region, and the province of Koulpelogo in the Center-East region.

Read the Safety and Security section on the Country Information page

If you decide to travel to Burkina Faso:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Take steps to mitigate the risk of becoming a victim of violence, including limiting trips to locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt. 
  • Review your personal security plans.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings and local events.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Burkina Faso.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

The Sahel Region

Due to the risk of attacks throughout the Sahel region, the U.S. Embassy has prohibited personal travel to, and placed restrictions on official government travel to the entire Sahel region.

The East Region

The U.S. Embassy has prohibited personal travel to, and placed restrictions on official government travel to the East region.

Centre Est Region

The U.S. Embassy has prohibited personal travel to, and placed restrictions on official government travel to the following province: Koulpelogo.

The Western Border Areas

The U.S. Embassy has prohibited personal travel to, and placed restrictions on official government travel to the following provinces: Koulpelogo, Loroum, Yatenga, Sourou, Kossi, Banwa, Kenedougou and the area within 50km of the Mali border, in the province of Houet.

Ouagadougou

Due to the potential for security operations in the Karpala, Balkiui and Rayongo (also known as Dayongo) neighborhoods of Ouagadougou’s Arrondissement 11, the U.S. Embassy prohibits personal travel to these neighborhoods.

  • To see a map of these regions, click HERE.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to security information, the State of Emergency, and restrictions to official government travel.

Posted: February 14, 2019, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Haiti due to crime and civil unrest.

There are currently widespread, violent, and unpredictable demonstrations in Port-au-Prince and elsewhere in Haiti.  Due to these demonstrations, on February 14, 2019, the Department of State ordered the departure of all non-emergency U.S. personnel and their family members. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Haiti.

Protests, tire burning, and road blockages are frequent and unpredictable.  Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents, and emergency response, including ambulance service, is limited or non-existent.

Travelers are sometimes targeted, followed, and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. The U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport, and it takes steps to detect surveillance and deter criminal attacks during these transports.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens due to reduced staffing and security concerns. The Embassy discourages its personnel from walking in most neighborhoods. The Embassy prohibits its personnel from:

  • Visiting establishments after dark without secure, on-site parking;
  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis;
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs;
  • Driving outside of Port-au-Prince at night;
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.; and
  • Visiting certain parts of the city at any time without prior approval and special security measures in place.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Haiti:

  • Avoid demonstrations.  Do not attempt to drive through roadblocks.
  • Arrange airport transfers and hotels in advance, or have your host meet you upon arrival.
  • Be careful about providing your destination address in Haiti. Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports in Haiti.
  • As you leave the airport, make sure you are not being followed. If you notice you are being followed, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Purchase travel insurance and medical evacuation insurance ahead of time.
  • Review information on Travel to High-Risk Areas
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Overseas Security Advisory Council report on Haiti.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

 

Posted: February 14, 2019, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Yemen due to terrorism, civil unrest, health risks, and armed conflict

Terrorist groups continue to plot and conduct attacks in Yemen. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting public sites, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Additionally, there is a continuing threat of kidnapping/detention by terrorists, criminal elements, and/or non-government actors. Employees of western organizations may be targeted for attack or kidnapping.

The U.S. Embassy in Sana’a suspended its operations in February 2015. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Yemen.

No part of Yemen is immune to violence. Critical levels of violence, to include armed conflict, artillery shelling, and air strikes, persist throughout the country. There are also reports of landmines throughout Yemen.

Military conflict has caused significant destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities.This limits the availability of electricity, clean water, and medical care. This instability often hampers the ability of humanitarian organizations to deliver critically needed food, medicine, and water. 

Yemen is home to the world's largest cholera outbreak, and the disease is present throughout the entire country. Due to the ongoing security situation, there is limited availability of food, electricity, water, medicine and medical supplies; adequate medical treatment is unavailable.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Yemen, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Yemen:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Consult the Centers for Disease Control’s webpage on Health Information for Travelers to Yemen.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. 
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and  Instagram
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Yemen.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to Risk Indicators and information on terrorism, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

 

Posted: February 14, 2019, 12:00 am

Reconsider travel to Pakistan due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Please read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Balochistan province and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, including the former Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), due to terrorism. 
  • The Azad Kashmir area due to terrorism and the potential for armed conflict.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Pakistan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, military installations, airports, universities, tourist locations, schools, hospitals, places of worship, and government facilities. Terrorists have targeted U.S. diplomats and diplomatic facilities in the past, and information suggests they continue to do so.

Terrorist attacks continue to happen across Pakistan, with most occurring in Balochistan and KPK, including the former FATA. Large-scale terrorist attacks have resulted in hundreds of casualties over the last several years.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Pakistan due to the security environment. Travel by U.S. government personnel within Pakistan is restricted, and additional restrictions on movements by U.S. government personnel outside of U.S. diplomatic facilities may occur at any time, depending on local circumstances and security conditions, which can change suddenly. 

The U.S. Consulate General in Peshawar is unable to provide any consular services to U.S. citizens.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or near Pakistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM).

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page

If you decide to travel to Pakistan: 

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings and local events.
  • Vary travel routes and timing, especially for routine trips.
  • Minimize the duration of trips to public markets, restaurants, government and military institutions, and other locations.
  • Minimize the number of U.S./Western nationals congregating in any one location at any time.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Pakistan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergencies. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Balochistan Province

Do not travel to Balochistan province. Active terrorist groups, an active separatist movement, sectarian conflicts, and deadly terrorist attacks against civilians, government offices, and security forces destabilize the province, including all major cities. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

KPK Province, including the former FATA

Do not travel to KPK province, which includes the former FATA. Active terrorist and insurgent groups conduct attacks against civilians, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government offices, and security forces. These groups historically have not discriminated between government officials and civilians. Assassination and kidnapping attempts are common, including the targeting of polio eradication teams.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Azad Kashmir

Do not travel to the Azad Kashmir area. Militant groups are known to operate in the area. The threat of armed conflict between India and Pakistan remains. Indian and Pakistani military forces periodically exchange fire across the Line of Control (LoC).

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

India-Pakistan Border

India and Pakistan maintain a strong military presence on both sides of the border. The only official Pakistan-India border crossing point for persons who are not citizens of India or Pakistan is in the province of Punjab between Wagah, Pakistan, and Atari, India. Travelers are advised to confirm the status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel. An Indian visa is required to enter India, and no visa services are available at the border. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas

  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergencies. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Posted: February 13, 2019, 12:00 am

Do not travel to Afghanistan due to armed conflict, terrorism, crime, and civil unrest

Travel to all areas of Afghanistan is unsafe because of critical levels of kidnappings, hostage taking, suicide bombings, widespread military combat operations, landmines, and terrorist and insurgent attacks, including attacks using vehicle-borne, magnetic, or other improvised explosive devices (IEDs), suicide vests, and grenades.  

Terrorist and insurgent groups continue planning and executing attacks in Afghanistan. These attacks occur with little or no warning, and have targeted official Afghan and U.S. government convoys and facilities, local government buildings, foreign embassies, military installations, commercial entities, non-governmental organization (NGO) offices, hospitals, residential compounds, tourist locations, transportation hubs, public gatherings, markets and shopping areas, places of worship, restaurants, hotels, universities, airports, schools, gymnasiums, and other locations frequented by U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals.

The U.S. Embassy's ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens in Afghanistan is severely limited, particularly outside of Kabul. Evacuation options from Afghanistan are extremely limited due to the lack of infrastructure, geographic constraints, and the volatile security situation.

Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Afghanistan. Unofficial travel to Afghanistan by U.S. government employees and their family members is restricted and requires prior approval from the Department of State.  U.S. Embassy personnel are restricted from traveling to all locations in Kabul except the U.S. Embassy and other U.S. government facilities unless there is a compelling U.S. government interest in permitting such travel that outweighs the risk. Additional security measures are needed for any U.S. government employee travel and movement through Afghanistan.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Afghanistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Afghanistan:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Consider signing a power of attorney.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Carry a communication device and, where possible, ride in armored vehicles.
  • Notify a trusted person of your travel itinerary and contact information. Avoid discussing your movement plans in public where you can be overheard or with persons who do not have the need to know.
  • Obtain medical evacuation insurance with a company that operates in Afghanistan and obtain a list of clinics and hospitals that may be used as an evacuation point.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter and  Instagram.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Afghanistan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with updates to information on terrorism.

Posted: February 13, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in the Dominican Republic due to crime.

Violent crime, such as robbery, murder, and sexual assault, is common. The wide availability of weapons, the use and trade of illicit drugs, and a weak criminal justice system contribute to the high level of criminality.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Dominican Republic:

  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for the Dominican Republic.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued after regular review with no changes.

Posted: February 12, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise normal precautions in Ghana. Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • Urban Areas due to crime.
  • Intercity highways after dark due to crime.
  • Parts of the Brong Ahafo, Northern, and Upper East Regions due to civil unrest.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Ghana:

Urban Areas – Level 2:  Exercise Increased Caution

Violent crime, such as street mugging, is more frequent in urban areas as compared to their surrounding suburbs. These crimes are also more prevalent at night and in isolated locations.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens.  Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to more serious crimes.

Intercity Highways – Level 2:  Exercise Increased Caution

Armed assaults on private vehicles and public transports occur more frequently after dark, often by criminal elements utilizing blockades to slow down and restrict movement of vehicles.

Brong Ahafo, Northern, and Upper East Regions – Level 2:  Exercise Increased Caution

Civil unrest due to chieftaincy disputes can occur at any time. While such disputes are typically non-violent, the likelihood for violence developing from a tribal dispute is greater in parts of these regions.  

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update:  Reissued after periodic review with updates to the Risk Indicators and Level 2 areas.

Posted: February 12, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Brazil due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Any areas within 150 km of Brazil’s land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay due to crime. (Note: This does not apply to the Foz do Iguacu National Park or Pantanal National Park.)
  • Do not use public buses in and around Recife due to crime (see additional information below).
  • Informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, communidades, and/or conglomerados), at any time of day due to crime (see additional information below).
  • Brasilia’s administrative regions (commonly known as “satellite cities”) of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa during non-daylight hours due to crime (see additional information below).
  • Recife’s Pina Beach from Dona Benvinda de Farias Street to the Brasilia Teimosa neighborhood after dark due to crime (see additional information below).

Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, and carjacking, is common in urban areas, day and night. Gang activity and organized crime is widespread. Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Brazil:

  • Be aware of your surroundings, especially when traveling to tourist locations and in crowded public venues.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Avoid walking on beaches after dark.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Avoid using an ATM in low-light or remote locations. Never let someone “shoulder surf” or assist you. Be aware that criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours. If you use an ATM, select those located inside of secure facilities, such as an airport, hospital, bank, or government building. 
  • Use caution at, or going to, major transportation centers or on public transportation, especially at night. Crime statistics indicate that passengers face an elevated risk of robbery or assault using public, municipal bus transportation throughout Brazil. Consider avoiding the use of public, municipal buses, at any time of day, and especially at night.
  • Use increased caution when hiking in isolated areas, and in particular around the city of Rio de Janeiro’s Corcovado Mountain trails. Multiple violent robberies have occurred on the hiking trails leading to and from Cristo Redentor on Corcovado Mountain, which are not regularly patrolled by Brazilian law enforcement.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Brazil.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

International Borders

U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to areas within 150 km of the international land borders with Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and Paraguay without advance approval from security officials due to crime. Travel to the Foz do Iguacu National Park and Pantanal National Park is permitted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Public Transportation

Crime statistics and trends indicate that persons face an elevated risk of robbery or assault using public bus systems throughout Brazil. Consider avoiding the use of public, municipal buses in Brazil at any time of day, and especially at night. The U.S. Government recommends against personnel using public, municipal buses in all parts of Brazil, and prohibits personnel from using public buses in and around Recife.

Informal Housing Developments (commonly known as “Favelas”)

Do not travel to informal housing developments (commonly referred to in Brazil as favelas, vilas, communidades, and/or conglomerados), even on a guided tour. Neither the tour companies nor the police can guarantee your safety when entering these communities. Even in these communities that the police or local governments deem safe, the situation can change quickly and without notice. In addition, exercise caution in areas surrounding these communities, as occasionally, inter-gang fighting and confrontations with police move beyond the confines of these communities. Except under limited circumstances and with advance approval, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to enter any informal housing developments in Brazil. Read the Safety and Security Section on the country information page for further information regarding favelas.

Visit our website for Travel High-Risk Areas.

Brasilia’s Administrative Regions (formerly known as “Satellite Cities”)

Without advance approval from security officials, U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to Brasilia’s Administrative Regions of Ceilandia, Santa Maria, Sao Sebastiao, and Paranoa between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. (non-daylight hours) due to crime.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Recife’s Pina Beach

U.S. government personnel are prohibited from walking after dark on Pina Beach, located in the northern part of Boa Viagem, due to crime. This restriction covers the sandy areas of Pina Beach starting at Dona Benvinda de Farias Street and ending at Brasilia Teimosa neighborhood.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with updates to information about U.S. government restrictions on personnel and Rio de Janeiro’s Corcovado Mountain trails.

Posted: February 6, 2019, 12:00 am

Exercise increased caution in Egypt due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Sinai Peninsula (with the exception of travel to Sharm El-Sheikh by air) due to terrorism.
  • The Western Desert due to terrorism.
  • Egyptian border areas due to military zones. 

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Egypt. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Terrorists have conducted attacks in urban areas, including in Cairo, despite the heavy security presence. Terrorists have targeted religious sites, to include mosques, churches, monasteries, and buses traveling to these locations.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Egypt, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Egypt:

Sinai Peninsula

The Sinai Peninsula remains a particularly dangerous area, with frequent attacks on security forces and civilians. 

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens anywhere in the Sinai Peninsula as U.S. government employees are not authorized to travel to these areas (with the exception of the beach resort of Sharm El-Sheikh; travel to Sharm El-Sheikh is only permitted by air). 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Posted: February 6, 2019, 12:00 am

 

Check out additional information on our travel page.

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