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The Sharpest Tool in the Shed

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014   8:26 pm |  Category:   Health, Humor, Life   |   2 Comments  
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Retirement and staying sharpI hate it when people say that many middle-aged people “aren’t the sharpest tools in the shed.” It’s condescending, insulting, naive and just plain wrong. What I hate even more, though, is being one of those dull tools. Alas, there are times when I feel I’m struggling to stay in the shed, period. 

 

This morning was a fine example of the three strikes towards the dull tool rule. This morning (really last night), I failed to barricade our kitchen, and our very naughty lab got in and scattered what she couldn’t eat down the hallway. I erased the new grocery list on the marker board, thinking it was last week’s, and left paperwork that was supposed to be turned in today on the kitchen table. I’m not stupid – it’s just that I don’t pay attention the way I should. 

 

How many times have things happened around you that only later you find important? Except for local jaunts, I get lost driving without written directions, even though I’ve been to these places dozens of times. I am terrible at relaying verbal messages from doctors, bankers and insurance agents, and although many things make sense to me, I have a hard time explaining them to others. Like I have crossed wires in my head. 

 

Is this the same woman who was commended for the creative language in her novels? The same who proofreads and enters information into a computer every day?  What happens to our ability to pay attention? Do we all become a little A-D-D as we get older? Is it just a case of not paying attention? Or something more sinister?

 

 
There are many people from their 20’s through their 80’s who bounce from cloud to cloud, half connected to the responsibilities of this world, half to another. Some are considered geniuses, others rebels. Some are trendsetters, others ne’re-do-wells. That doesn’t mean they are slower or duller than others. They are just considered eccentric.  Everybody forgets things ― everybody does things now and then in a skewered way. The important thing to do in times like these is to learn from your idiosyncrasies. If you can’t change them, join them! 

 

Start with slowing down. “I don’t go fast!” you reiterate. Perhaps not. But in some circles even full speed ahead isn’t fast enough. We see others around us moving faster, driving faster, coming to conclusions faster, and that makes us feel inferior. Our brain tells us we are not, yet try telling that to our ego. We are so busy trying to keep one step ahead of the game, thinking about the next play, the next set of consequences, that we fail to finish the game we are currently playing.

 

When I take the grocery list with me and not the checkbook, it doesn’t mean I’m stupid. It just means I didn’t take time to complete the circle, i.e., grocery list = buying groceries = no cash on hand = pay with a check. Half the time I’m already planning the meal I’m going to cook (once I buy the groceries) or even further, meals for next week and maybe I should give my grandson a call and I wonder what they call those wraps for Chinese dumplings. Eccentric like the rest.

 

I think it’s the simple things that trip us up the most. I don’t do well remembering driving directions because, I admit, I don’t focus on taking this road to that highway to that street. As a passenger, I’m too busy chatting or looking out the windows at the cows and the clouds or reading a book or talking to my car mates. This highway and that street aren’t important to me at that moment. That doesn’t mean they are not important at all ― just not at that particular moment of remembering. 

 

Same thing with worrying if I turned off the curling iron or picked up the stack of bills on the table to drop in the mailbox. Both situations are important — it’s just that I’m thinking about more important things of the moment, like punching into work on time. The bills in the box and the iron in my bathroom will be taken care of in due time.

 

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2 Comments
  1. Jenny Jun 28th 2014  10:41 pm

    I can relate to many of your points especially getting lost whenever I drive anywhere and I can’t tell you how many times I wrote grocery lists and then could not find them. But I don’t take this stuff too seriously and I don’t view this as any indication of my level of intelligence :-)

  2. Barbara Morris Oct 13th 2014  12:40 am

    Youth is free. You don’t have to do anything to keep it. But then comes “middle age”. If you want to keep as many youthful attributes as possible, it takes EFFORT. I regularly do brain games, Lumosity in particular. I don’t know if it really helps, and even if it doesn’t, I can say I tried — that I made the EFFORT.


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